Videos

We love all sorts of games at Muse! Our big focus is on miniatures gaming, but we enjoy cardgames, boardgames, video games…all sorts of games in fact! So do our content producers, we have some fantastic articles, podcasts and videos which will show you how these games are played, and maybe give you some ideas for what to pick up next!

Why S&P Feels Like S&M

Posted by on 1:29 pm

This is a foundation/mid level article on Signs and Portents.  The gentlemen on MoM posed a question on Podcast 11.  Here’s my stab a response. Does Signs and Portents affect your chance to roll a critical attack? The short answer is yes.  I’ll walk you through the intuition behind it and then give you a few pretty pictures with math to show you that I’m not a liar. Critical effects occur when dice outcomes on two or more dice are the same AND the sum of the dice is sufficient to hit the target.  In an earlier article, I talked a bit about intersection probabilities and that’s what we’re looking at here.  What affects the odds of rolling doubles?  What affects the odds of rolling sufficient to hit a target?  Critical effects are impacted by either scenario because they are at the intersection of the two components. Signs and Portents increases your average result on two dice from 7 to 8.46.  As a result, your intuition should be that it increase your critical effects through the “increased likelihood to hit” pathway. If you apply brut force to the math and write out every possible combination of dice outcome you’ll see that more high pairings occurs as a result of the spell ([5,5] and [6,6]).  You approximately double the likelihood of rolling boxcars when rolling 3d6 minus the lowest versus straight 2d6.  Fun. PerfectCircle from the Focus & Fury boards put together a great graphic showing all the iterations of dice and attack rolls you might care about.  It’s frankly a lot prettier than the one I put together so I’m going to use it.  PerfectCircle, you are a both a gentleman and a scholar.  Thank you.  Here it is; The more you know… (hum the little diddy in your head when you read this last...

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Mad Science

Posted by on 11:40 am

Hey all, its me again, coming at you with another wacky list.  This time I will be focusing upon the Minion forces and per a request that crazy doctor, Arkadius.  But to bring it to picture I will also be showing a list that is yet another theme list.  But thankfully for the doctor most of what you would run with him is already allowed to be taken within his theme requirements so there wasn’t much more that was truly needed in the list.  I personally feel his theme list is stronger than what the normal Thornfall list would be allowed to take.  So lets first take a look at the requirements and benefits then lets take a look at the list: Tier 1 Requirement:  Nothing Tier 1 Benefit:  1pt reduction upon War Hog warbeasts Tier 2 Requirement:  1 unit of Bone Grinders Tier 2 Benefit:  Redeploy 1 model/unit Tier 3 Requirement:  1 unit of Farrow Brigands Tier 3 Benefit:  +1 to go first Tier 4 Requirement:  3 War Hogs Tier 4 Benefit:  +2SPD to warbeasts in the army turn 1   Dr. Arkadius +6 Gun Boar 5 War Hog (1/6) 1 War Hog (1) 7 War Hog (1) 7 Targ 2 Rorsh 9 4 Bone Grinders 10 Farrow Brigands 8 Razorback Crew 3 Slaughterhousers 6 Total:  50/59   So lets take a look at the doctor himself.  He has an average stat line for when it comes down to comparing him to another per spellcasting warlock, though his ARM and life boxes are below average.  Even though he has a low MAT he does have some cool abilities that though he shouldn’t really be in melee but if you are able to protect him then the abilities are well worth it.  If he hits with his magical melee needle then he does not do a damage roll but immediately inflicts 1 point of damage to a living model, keep in mind only living models but any type of living model.  The first ability his weapon has is that it makes the damaged model stationary.  The second effect is that the model damaged can not cast spells, upkeep, or use animi.  The last ability will not work on warcaster/warlocks but if you damage the model then you get to take control of the model and move it and make an attack with it.  Keep in mind all these abilities only work if you damage the model and it has to be living.  But it is pretty nice to take over a warbeast damaged by his melee weapon and move it and make an attack.  One of his built in abilities is Maltreatment, this is where he can take a fury point off of a warbeast and put it on himself.  This is great to run a beast to max fury and then remove one from it to allow yourself to have another transfer target.  Keep in mind this will do anywhere from 1 to 3 damage to the warbeast that you do this to and you can only do it once per turn.  Also this ability is something you have to be careful with as most of the eligible models in the list can also damage their selves to get benefits, but I will go into what that is...

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MoM’s Podcast # 12

Posted by on 2:59 am

MoM’s Podcast #12 Topics: 2:45 – New Player Section (Read your cards/rules) 17:05 – News and Announcements 42:05 – Spoilers (Vyros2 feat) 55:46 – Steamroller Segment (Meta Benders to Unravel – Lylyth2) 1:48:35 – Muse on Mail 2:13:45 – Mayhem Cup Wrap Up 3:18:45 – Dojo Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 3:41:27 — 202.7MB)Subscribe: Android |...

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Aging the new stuff!

Posted by on 6:15 pm

Hello all! I am a professional painter based out of the Kansas City area, and after painting for so many years, I realized that it was time to start passing on the knowledge to a more general audience than who just bothers me for help when they see me. And to be totally honest, when I get specific questions, the most common one is how to create a weathered look on miniatures. You know, rust, tarnish, scrapes and such. You want to make your stuff look like it’s been through hell and won the battle, right? So let me tell you how I do it when I’m trying to make it happen. It’s certainly not the only way, but I feel like it’s the easiest ways for just about anyone to do. And it involves making your own washes. Yes, it sounds complicated – is it really? No…and I’ll prove it, dang it! Now here’s what you need…. A bowl or an empty paint bottle to mix in. The paint colors I will list below or something similar. FloAid – a paint thinner you can get at just about any hobby store – Reaper makes a good one! Just ask someone that works there to help you find it on their paint racks. Rubbing Alcohol To make a tarnish wash : I use Vallejo Game color as a line in this. 1 drop of Magic Blue 2 drops of Goblin Green 1 drop of Pure White 15 drops of FloAid 15 drops of water. 3 drops of rubbing alcohol If it’s in a bowl, mix it up with a paint brush. If it’s in an empty paint dropper, cap it and shake it up! It’s then ready to use! Just put a little out in a paint well, and apply sparingly around the joints. Should end up looking something like the pictures below! Now, the rust wash! 1 drop of Beasty Brown 5 drop of water 10 drops of FloAid 1 drop of rubbing alcohol And….GO! Mix away! And there you go! Quick and easy ways to make a wash. Just apply over all the areas you want to look rusted or tarnished – it will sink down into the crevices and form pockets just like real rust would on a real...

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Muse on Minis + Chain Attack = ?

Posted by on 4:03 pm

+ =   ?   Greetings All, Phatasian here. I just wanted to drop a quick note out there for you all.  You might of noticed that Jay from Chain-Attack has recently started writing articles here at Muse.   Muse and Chain Attack will be working collaboratively on some exciting things in the future.  Keep your eyes peeled for more new announcements. Warmachine Weekend is going to be really awesome this year.  I have been talking with Hot Carl and trust me when I tell you that it is going to be THE Warmachine/Hordes event to get too in 2012.  Jay, Trevor and Scott are trying to get to Warmachine Weekend and need our help.  We are going to be working with them on some unique coverage of the events at WMW and there is talk of a podcasters only throwdown.  We need them there for that to happen though.  If you have some spare change clinking around in your pocket you should go to HERE and back them.   Help us get the word out. I’m a proud Backer !!...

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Templecon by the numbers

Posted by on 8:17 am

  The Templecon 2012 convention was held in Februari 2012, and hosted a number of tournaments that together represent one of the major competitive events in the Warmachine and Hordes season. That makes it a good opportunity to take a snapshot of the competitive environment. Who is playing what, and more importantly, who is winning? The below numbers were originally posted on the Privateer Press forums, using tournament data from the 7 singles tournaments at Templecon, but they are repeated here as the first in a series of such breakdowns, as more tournament data becomes available. Numbers are fun, but they don’t mean much if you can’t compare them. Very important disclaimer: These numbers are a limited snapshot of one event. Interesting, but not by themselves representative of the state of Warmachine/Hordes as a whole. Please don’t consider them as anything else. Attendance Convention A grand total of 489 matches were played. 162 players played at least one tournament round. The maximum amount of games by a single player was 18. 23 people played 10+ games, 4 people played only a single round. The average player played 6.03 games in 1.49 tournaments. Tournament breakdown Blood, Sweat and Tiers: 26 players Flanks: 45 players Hardcore: 35 players Standard Issue: 43 players Death Race: 63 players Last Rites: 14 players Masters: 16 players ELO ranking An ELO system is often used in games such as Chess or Go, and creates a player rating that is adjusted by a number of points relative to the skill of their opponent, each game. If all Templecon players would start out at the same level, after the tournament the ranking would look like the following: http://www.wmladder.com/ranking/2 It’s pretty interesting to note that Jamie Perkins took the top spot from Will Pagani only in the Masters finals itself. Faction Popularity 141 people played a single faction throughout the event, 19 people played 2 factions, 2 people played 3 different factions. That makes for 185 different armies. The armies were distributes across the factions as follows:   Faction # Armies % Armies Circle Orboros 22 12% Cryx 28 15% Cygnar 22 12% Khador 23 12% Legion of Everblight 22 12% Mercenaries 15 8% Minions 8 4% Protectorate of Menoth 14 8% Retribution of Scyrah 6 3% Skorne 14 8% Trollbloods 11 6% A slight preference for Cryx among, followed by a group of evenly represented factions, but Minions and Retribution were underrepresented. Faction Performance It is valuable to take a look at how the win percentage is distributed across the the factions. However, as the number of matches is quite limited to make a good estimate, the percentages are represented as a 95% confidence interval. Faction # armies ± interval Circle Orboros 50,5% 9,3% Cryx 59,5% 7,9% Cygnar 47,5% 9,7% Khador 48,7% 9,1% Legion of Everblight 41,6% 9,6% Mercenaries 46,0% 12,3% Minions 50,0% 15,9% Protectorate of Menoth 47,0% 12,0% Retribution of Scyrah 42,9% 18,3% Skorne 57,5% 11,3% Trollbloods 47,8% 14,4% Top Bracket Along with the average performance for the entire field of participants, we can contrast the performance of the top players, to examine peak performance. Only players with at least an average number of games were considered (no greater weight is given to competitions like the Masters, this is simply matches played and won, per player). Looking at the top 25% of players, are any factions better represented than others? Unequivocally yes, fully...

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The Speed Painters Manifesto

Posted by on 7:48 pm

Are you a bare metal general? Or do spend your whole weekend painting just the belt buckle on a model? Do you love to hate to paint or maybe hate to love to paint? I am here to break you free! This article is about Speed Painting. In this article I will talk about changing how you think about painting and even show you a few time saving steps. First off who am I? I’m Quickwork. A long time gamer who started with Warhammer 40k and graduated into the wonderful world of Warmachine. I have a deep passion for Table Top Wargames and love nothing better than a competitive Wargame between two fully painted armies. I am also a MOKAN Warmachine member here in the Midwest,USA. As a player I believe you have the onus to contribute to your community. You should support your local game group, evangelize the hobby to new gamers and participate in the modeling side of your hobby. The first two are pretty self explanatory. You want your community to have the resources it needs to survive and you want your group to grow. But where does modeling go into contributing to your community. Everyone loves to see painted models. It is what first attracts us to the hobby and keeps us frothing over when new models are spoiled and finally hit the store shelves. It is hard to express why rolling dice and pouring over rules gives us as gamers so much pleasure but it is easy even to non-gamers to see why pictures of models are so enthralling. The look so dang cool. Imagine if you went to see the latest blockbuster action movie. Sweet car chase scenes, gunfights and babes all fill the movie screen with awesome explosions and sound effects. Would anyone argue that action movie would be better if it was just in black and white? The same point goes to painting your models. All the components come together with color. On to Speed painting. The first step to Speed painting is to get yourself in the right mind set to paint. Set aside a small amount of time each week to dedicate to the hobby. I am a bit nuts so I set aside 30mins-2hrs each night to painting. I paint a lot, but for the regular John Q. Gamer I would suggest two 30min-1hr sessions during the work week and 1 2hr session on the weekend. I usually paint while watching TV, talking on the phone or while keeping my fiancé company while she does something in the house. What matters most about this time is you dedicate it to this activity. You are going to paint for however long you decide and once that time is up you get up and do something else. This can help to keep you focused on painting while you are painting and keeps the activity fresh so it is something to look forward to for the next time you have dedicated to it. Have your work station ready. I like to keep my work station easy to access and simple to set up and put away. I use a Magic the Gathering Play mat, a small jar of water, a white tile with paper towel and the brushes. I can easily...

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Sportsmanship

Posted by on 5:04 pm

Greetings wargamers!  I am Jay Larsen, one of the hosts of the Chain Attack podcast.   This is the first installment of my weekly article, “Chain Attack: Baby Seal Boots Camp”.  Each week this article will focus on a different topic that has been suggested by a Chain Attack listener or reader. We’ll start with my background.  I have owned and operated Gameopolis, a friendly local game store in Idaho Falls, Idaho, for the last seven years.  My online business is www.discountgamesinc.com, a webstore dedicated to selling the entire Warmachine & Hordes product line with prompt shipping and the lowest possible prices.  I have been playing Warmachine since Apotheosis, and I have worked with local press gangers to grow our community.  My community holds regular tournaments, leagues, and travels to regional events.  My podcast can be found at www.chain-attack.com.  Each weekly episode takes a humorous approach to reporting a match-up and grades the two casters involved. Without further ado… Don’t be THAT GUY! Every community has him.  People dread to play him.  He is willing to do anything to get a victory.  He makes wins feel tainted and makes losses even more bitter.  His table etiquette enrages you.  Even more dangerous than that, he splits communities and drives away players. The DON’TS: Things that cheapen your opponent’s victory Don’t make excuses for why you lost. Don’t tell your opponent that their faction is overpowered. Don’t complain about your dice. Cheating Don’t make magic measurements that increase the movement of a model. Don’t bend your tape measure. Don’t move your tape measure while moving your model. Don’t inaccurately share the statistics and abilities of your models. Things that destroy the fun of the game Don’t get hung up on a rules dispute. Don’t have your turn take excessive amounts of time in a casual game. Don’t be a dick!  There are many comments or actions that become unacceptable depending on how they are said or done.   Be THIS GUY. Every community has him.  People love to play him.  He is is willing to do anything to have a fun game.  He enables defeats to feel as good as victories.  His table etiquette is superb.  His willingness to nurture others not only grows communities, it strengthens them. The DOS: Things that elevate your opponent’s victory Be gracious in victory and defeat. Complement a good tactic that your opponent employed. Table etiquette Politely remind your opponent of rules interactions, even when it doesn’t benefit you. At the start of an activation, declare what models you are activating and what they are doing BEFORE you begin movement or measuring. Give your opponent enough time to verify your dice rolls. Allow your opponent opportunity to confirm ranges and measurements. Share information, such as when a system or aspect is destroyed. Be quick when performing activities on your opponent’s turn, like tough checks. Things that create a fun game Ask your opponent what kind of game they are looking for and bring a list that is appropriate, when playing a casual game. Provide tips, tricks, and tactics you actually use when your opponents request feedback. Remember that both of you are playing the game to have fun. Stop THAT GUY! Avoidance is a common tactic used when dealing with THAT GUY, but it doesn’t solve...

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